K1 - Blog

  1. What Does a Harmonic Balancer do?

    What Does a Harmonic Balancer do?

    Harmonic balancers are a staple ingredient of any engine build, but what do they really do? Do you have to have one? Is bigger really better? We clear the air about the right balancer to hang on your crankshaft. 

    Harmonic balancers are misnamed. They do not balance an engine, rather they absorb and remove unwanted vibration due to torsional twisting of the crankshaft. They are in effect vibration dampeners and are frequently called dampeners. Dampeners are like torsional shock absorbers used to dampen torsional twist and vibration in an engine. Torsional vibration is a twisting vibration caused by the firing pulses of each combustion event. The force of the combustion process causes the crank to deflect ever so slightly in the direction of the force, and when that force goes away the crank ever-so-slightly springs back. At certain frequencies the crank can resonate, making the vibration much worse. With eight cylinders firing, these forces are moving back and

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  2. What is Sleeve Length and How It Can Make or Break Your Stroker Engine

    What is Sleeve Length and How It Can Make or Break Your Stroker Engine

     Sleeve length is often overlooked in favor of maximum cubic inches, but in order to build a long-lasting, high-powered engine it is a major consideration. We explore sleeve length, stroke, and selecting rotating assembly components that work in harmony. 

    An engine is an ecosystem of moving, complimentary parts. Changing just one of those parts affects the entire system as a whole. Stroker crankshafts, while the premier way to add power, torque, and displacement, can dramatically change the operating condition of the piston. Without careful attention to detail and proper planning, sometimes for the worse. In this segment, we show you how to ensure your stroker crank works well with the piston and rod combination at hand. 

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  3. How to Check Crankshaft End Play

    How to Check Crankshaft End Play

    Checking and setting proper crankshaft end play is a vital engine-building step. We show you how to do the job in this tech segment. 

    Engine building isn’t difficult – as long as everything goes according to plan. The challenge for the engine builder is to anticipate problems before they occur. Much of the process of becoming a successful engine builder is checking all the clearances and custom setting them when they are out of tolerance.

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  4. How to Check Bearing Clearances

    How to Check Bearing Clearances

    Verifying and adjusting bearing clearance is one of the most critical aspects of building an engine. In this segment, we dive into the mechanics of how to measure your crank, connecting rods, and bearings. 

    The simple fact is that setting bearing clearance for a performance engine is something that cannot be short cut. There are no quick and easy ways to establish this critical clearance regardless whether the engine is a bone-stock cruiser or a road course animal that will endure hundreds of miles of abuse.

    We will run through the basics on how to measure bearing clearance and illustrate how to avoid mistakes. This will also require some critical measuring tools. Let’s just put this right out front – measuring bearing clearance for a performance engine cannot be accomplished with Plastigage. Those little pieces of wax thread are not precision measurement devices and should not be used to define bearing clearance. That may hurt some people’s feelings – but

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  5. K1 Rotating Assemblies Make Engine Building Easy

    K1 Rotating Assemblies Make Engine Building Easy

    A successful engine build begins with the right components. K1 Technology’s rotating assemblies give you a head start with high-quality internals that are perfectly matched, with no guesswork.

    There are guys out there who know it all by heart. Roll a freshly-machined block into their garage and they’ll order up the right engine internals with part numbers taken straight from memory. Want to bump the compression ratio? They know the correct combination of rods, pistons, and crankshaft to make it happen off the top of their heads. Are you looking to throw a little more displacement at the build? They’ll pull the appropriate part numbers for the slugs to match your overbore and a stroker crank out of thin air.

    The rest of us? Not so much.

    We’ll spend hours on the computer trying to figure out what mix of different parts will accomplish what we’re trying to do, and then second-guess that decision until it

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  6. Go Big or Go Home With K1 Technologies LS Stroker Crankshafts

    K1 LS Stroker Crank

    K1 is flush with LS stroker crankshafts to take your block from boring to big-inch. 

    Ready to feel old? The LS engine turned 21 this year. If it were human, it would have a high-school diploma and could legally down a six-pack of beer. After two decades of LS swaps, builds, records, and race wins, it's as popular as ever, and there more of cores than ever to go around. 

    If you've picked up an LS core for your project, there's a good chance it has considerable miles on it. A bore, hone, and hot tank almost always work into the build plan, but what about the crank? The stock LS crankshaft is a stout and admirable piece, but one of the many  strong points of the LS architecture is its taller deck height (over the gen I small block) and the ability to stroke it to torquier cubic inches. 

    That's where K1's line of LS stroker crankshafts

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  7. K1's Ultimate LS Swap Cranks Let You Personalize Your LS Stroker Crankshaft

    K1's Ultimate LS Swap Cranks Let You Personalize Your LS Stroker Crankshaft

    LS engines are all about interchangeability and swap-ability. K1's line of LS7 crankshafts makes it possible to add factory dry-sump oiling to any Gen III/IV LS engines. 

    K1 Technologies is now helping resolve one of the more frustrating idiosyncrasies of the LS engine platform; that is, GM’s switch from 24 to 58 teeth on the reluctor wheel. Now that millions of LS engines and parts are in the salvage yard, available at swap meets or posted in online classifieds, the difference in the reluctor wheel can limit creative vehicle builds or engine swaps. One such option is adapting LS7 dry-sump gear to a Gen III block.

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  8. What is a Narrow Bearing?

    What is a Narrow Bearing?

    Engine building is all about the details, and choosing the right set of engine bearings to match your crankshaft is an important one! Inside we investigate what a narrow bearing is and when you should use them.

    It seems every day that there is a new post on social media about street engines making four-digit power. A killer late model Hemi with a blower easily pushes past 1,100 horsepower and Mike Moran has built an all-billet, twin-turbo engine that made 5,300 horsepower. The power numbers keep escalating and yet far less attention is paid to what it takes for crankshafts, pistons, and connecting rods to survive these ever-escalating, and easier-than-ever-to-achieve power levels.

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  9. What is Deck Height? How to Calculate and What it Means

    deck height defined

    Deck height is a vital engine measurement that dictates rod length, crankshaft stroke, piston-to-head clearance, and so much more. Here, we define deck height, how to measure it, and its impact on your next engine build. 

    It’s all part of the art of building a performance or competition engine. The details separate the exceptional from the also-rans. Some specs like rod and main bearings receive a majority of the attention, but ignore something as simple as deck height and you could find a piston smacking the head at high rpm is not a good way for reciprocating parts to become acquainted.

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  10. Tips to Know Before You Build a Chevy Stroker Engine

    Chevy Stroker K1

    Planning a stroker build? Here are a few things you should know before you get started.


    It wasn’t all that long ago (okay, LBJ was president and Bonanza was a hit TV show so maybe it was a long time ago) that a factory 327 / 350 hp small-block has serious street cred' and Chevy’s 427 making 435 horsepower was boulevard king. Today, it’s a walk in the park to build a 500 hp small-block and a 650 hp big-block Chevy with purely aftermarket parts–but these engines enjoy lots of cubic inches.

    K1 Technologies rotating assembly
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